Facebook at 1AM SF!

Facebook joins us at 1Am SF for a graffiti art class where they got to create their own Facebook mural piece! With the guidance of our graffiti teachers groups get to come in and create an exciting experience through learning and creating street art. Our workshops are great ways to do something different with your company and team build as you create your very own mural. For emails and inquiries contact vanessa@1amsf.com to sign up for one of our awesome team building workshops!

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Street and Social Change: Ernest Zacharevic’s “Splash and Burn” Project

!!splash_and_burn11 (1)Ernest Zacharevic in Medan | Photo by Hype Media

Recently, Lithuanian artist, Ernest Zacharevic brought together a group of artists to begin a curated public works project on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. A play on “slash-and burn,” this project, titled “Splash and Burn” brings to light the problem of illegal palm oil harvesting in Indonesia. Over the course of two years, Zacharevic has gathered a group of creatives which include, Mark Jenkins, Axel Void, Pixel Pancho, Isaac Cordal, Strok, Gabriel Pitcher and Bibichun. Smane 2, Combat, and Reginal O’Niel have also contributed to the project.

splash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-09 Isaac Cordal in North Sumatra | Photo by Isaac Cordal

Conflict palm oil harvesting is not only an environmental issue but a human rights violation due to its effects on transboundary haze, deforestation, and human and animal displacement.Indonesia happens to be the largest producer of palm oil. Facing the large consumer demand for palm oil and timber, the local economy resorts to the “slash-and-burn” to clear up large patches of forest land for palm oil plantations. Farmers first cut down vegetation and set a fire to quickly clear the rest. The World Wildlife Fund estimates that up to 300 football fields of forest are cleared every hour. Indonesia happens to be the largest producer of palm oil.This not only affects Indonesia but forests worldwide.

2splash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-03Ernest Zacharevic in Bukit Lawang | Photo by Ernest Zacharevic

In regards to the environment, “Slash-and-burn” produces emits greenhouse gases, harms local vegetation, threatens biodiversity, destroys animal homes, and pollutes the water. The fires produce a thick smog that engulfs the air. The yellow toxic air has caused 6 Indonesian provinces to declare a state of emergency. To put it in perspective, anything above a 300 pollution index is considered hazardous. Areas of Indonesia can reach as high as 2,000 on the pollution index.

splash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-05Mark Jenkins in Riau Peatlands | Photo by Ernest Zacharevic

Local communities are the first to feel these effects. Deforestation threatens the livelihood of farmers and locals outside of the palm oil industry. Many companies develop farms without the consideration of indigenous people who rely on or occupy the land. Rarely are these people compensated. Children as young as 7 years old can be found working for these companies to support their families. They are paid low wages for long hours and sometimes paid none at all. According to the NGO, Friends of the Earth, the palm oil industry is one of the top four worst industries of forced and child labor.

yessplash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-02Ernest Zacharevic in Medan | Photo by Ernest Zacharevic

Zacherevic first became interested in the matter when clouds of smoke traveled from Indonesia to the location of his studio in Penang, Malaysia. Though the issue does receive some International attention, Zacherevic felt that the media needed to bring light to the outside of the burning seasons. Working with international as well as local Indonesian NGOs such as OIC, “Splash and Burn” creates a platform for an otherwise overlooked crisis. Over the course of two years, Zacherevic worked with these organizations to gather spaces for his curated group of artists to tell a story about the issue. Ranging from murals to installations to sculptures, each piece highlights a different victim of the issue.

YAS        Isaac Cordal in North Sumatra | Photo by Isaac Cordal

Ultimately, Zacherevic’s desire for “Slash and Burn” is to educate worldwide consumers on the direct connection they have with this corrupt industry. From food to cosmetics, palm oil can be found in countless products. Consciously buying products derived from conflict-free palm oil can drive down the consumer demand and make a bold statement about popular palm oil farming practices.

More info about Zacherevic and “Splash and Burn” can be found at: http://www.ernestzacharevic.com/splash-and-burn-2/

To learn more about the illegal palm oil industry and what you can do to stop it, head to:  http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/

Support the displaced Orangutans:                                                                             http://orangutancentre.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Street Art & Social Change: Lorenzo Quinn shows “Support” in Venice

With the state of the environment, many historic cities are facing the threat of rising sea levels.  In reaction, Italian sculptor Lorenzo Quinn highlighted this issue by unveiling his latest installation at Venice’s annual art installation, Venice Biennale 2017.

 

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Entitled, Support, the sculpture depicts two hands rising out of Venice’s Grand Canal toward the Sagredo Hotel. The hands reflect the two conflicting sides of human nature – the creative and the destructive.  Support highlights the idea that humans have the direct ability to impact the course of history and the environment. We could destroy the world, however, it is up to us save it.

Quinn aims to highlight climate change and the rising sea levels that could affect Venice along with the rest of the world.  Significantly Venice, a floating city, faces the direct effects of rising sea levels. With his piece, he encourages the world to act now in order to reverse the impact we’ve had on the environment. 

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Quinn draws inspiration from his own children. In an interview with Mashable, Quinn says “I have three children, and I’m thinking about their generation and what world we’re going to pass on to them. I’m worried, I’m very worried.” In fact, the hands themselves are molded after his son’s. Using a method known as “lost wax casting” he created a wax model of the sculpture and molded resin around it. Underwater, four 30 foot pillars hold the hands in place.

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Lorenzo Quinn intends to showcase “Support” as a rotating installation, with plans to bring the hands to other UNESCO World Heritage sites also facing destruction due to climate change.

More of Lorenzo Quinn’s work can be found at https://www.lorenzoquinn.com/

Google Street Art Class in San Francisco

A group from google came by 1AM to create their own individual art pieces! Our Street Art Workshop includes a brief history lesson, walking tour and stencil creations. This is a great option for a team building course where everyone will have something to take home with them!

For team building workshop inquiries please contact vanessa@1amsf.com

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Street Art & Social Change: Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

On the streets of Brooklyn in 2012, local street artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh decided that she had had enough of catcalling. After a stranger on the street asked her to smile for him, she used this as the basis for an ongoing series of street art entitled, Stop Telling Women to Smile (STWTS). Late at night, armed with a roller brush and some posters, Fazlalizadeh began wheat-pasting graphite posters on the walls of public streets, the most common site of catcalling. These posters are all portraits of women, some of the artist herself, but mostly of various different women from all kinds of walks of life. Fazlalizadeh realized as her project went on that street harassment was not restricted to women like her, but that women of all skin colors, religions, sexualities and gender expression were targets as well. In the end, this inspired the diversity and multilinguality of STWTS.

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These portraits are strong, they are sources of power for women. Fazlalizadeh interviewed several women before she made portraits of them. She wanted to understand how experiences differed from and paralleled each other, so that each figure took on her own identity and backstory. These women are direct, they do not allow themselves to be looked upon. They instead look back at their audience, authoritative and powerful. The power of the male gaze is impotent for these women, the only gaze they allow is their own.
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Each figure is accompanied by text, some in English, but also in Spanish, French, and other languages. The text is usually different for each figure, but the tone is the same: there is no debt women owe to men, no reason to be harassed, no place for catcalling. STWTS expands as Fazlalizadeh travels to new places with new cultures, and stands as a visual protest to a patriarchal society that has not learned the true power of the female.

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Opening Night Recap: “Get With the Program” by Pemex and Klops

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We’d like to send a huge thank you to all of our friends who came through last night for the opening of “Get with the Program” by Pemex and Klops. It was a crazy night of fun, laughter, and, of course, plenty of brand new art. Thank you for supporting your favorite artists and your favorite local art gallery! In case you couldn’t join us for the festivities, the show will be on display until April 15, 2017.

Congrats to Pemex and Klops on such a great opening night!

For inquiries or catalog requests contact artsales@1amgallery.com.

 

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Google Street Art Workshop

It’s always a fun time when Google joins us at our San Francisco location for a team-building workshop. Our Street Art Package is a great option for groups looking to do more individualized activities and gives each guest something to take home with them. Check out the awesome stencil based mural they created on a canvas to take back to their offices!

For team building workshops or private class inquiries please contact vanessa@1amsf.com

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Spotlight on Adam Fujita’s “My Life in Letters”

“My Life in Letters,” a podcast documenting graffiti, street art, and hip hop culture, is a must-listen for anyone interested in the graffiti scene. Host Adam Fujita (aka ATOM), interviews a different artist each time, delving into their histories, styles, interests, and influences as writers. These podcasts bring the unique perspectives and stories of graffiti writers to the foreground, providing some casual, unpretentious yet interesting discourse. In the first of twelve available podcasts on iTunes, Fujita talks with New York artist Zimad, aka Luis Lamboy about growing up in the Big Apple in the 60’s and 70’s, his early days in graffiti, and how he chose his name. Be sure to check out My Life in Letters for free on iTunes!

Check out Fujita’s most recent work with the Bay Area’s own Joker. Here are some progress shots as well as the finished product!

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1AM First Friday Event with Eddie Colla

1AM Gallery is happy to present our First Friday event with Eddie Colla, this Friday, December 2, 2017. Come by our booth to get to know Eddie, and pick up one of his limited edition prints. The prints will be released online that morning at 10AM PST, including 10 hand-embellished prints within the edition of 50. Eddie’s style in these pieces draws on the experience of remembering, where the past is documented or erased by our minds, both at will and at random. Experiences are not taken to be individual entities, but rather a collective that leave a unique imprint on our minds.

Here’s a peak at Longest Winter, as well as a statement from Eddie himself:

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“I created this piece for the exhibition “Nothing Lasts Forever” in August 2015.
The phrase, nothing lasts forever referred literally to the work I had spent the prior year putting up illegally in my travels. More importantly it referred to my life being in a state of flux. I use text in these pieces to both recount and erase. The process of making these pieces is the process of remembering and cataloging my state of mind over a period of time.

The remaining text is not a clear legible narrative, but rather a intersecting cacophony of experiences. To me the clarity of specificity of those experiences is secondary to the collective stain they leave. The mark of things that once were and no longer are. The Longest Winter refers to this period. It was dense and almost impossible to recollect, moving past me at a speed where I was often not there. Either looking ahead or looking back, I missed much of it. Like sleeping on a train and waking with no memory of the journey, only the realization that you have arrived somewhere very different then where you started.

In the end it is usually one person, one chance experience that is the fulcrum. This was mine” – Eddie Colla

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Kids Street Art Class

We got back in touch with the kid inside of us with a workshop for these little guys. It was great to show these kids how to make their own art. Check out their finished products!

For team building workshop or private class inquiries please contact vanessa@1amsf.com

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