BACK AND FORTH BY COLLIN VAN DER SLUIJS & SUPER-A

OPENING RECEPTION JUNE 8TH 7PM
SHOWING THROUGH JULY 13TH

Check out our recap of Back and Forth by Collin van der Sluijs and Super A currently on view at First Amendment Gallery in Downtown San Francisco!  We want to thank everyone that made it out to the opening and to the two artists for all of their hard work the past two weeks.  Be sure to contact info@firstamendmentgallery.com to learn more about available works.

 

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As apart of their duo exhibition, Back and Forth, Collin van der Sluijs and Super A recently completed a large beautiful wall on the side of the gallery in Downtown San Francisco.  Apocalypse, is in reference to the four horseman of the Apocalypse.  Be sure to check out the mural and exhibition in person at First Amendment Gallery through July 13th!  To learn more about the available works of Collin and Super A contact info@firstamendmentgallery.com.

 

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Street and Social Change: Ernest Zacharevic’s “Splash and Burn” Project

!!splash_and_burn11 (1)Ernest Zacharevic in Medan | Photo by Hype Media

Recently, Lithuanian artist, Ernest Zacharevic brought together a group of artists to begin a curated public works project on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. A play on “slash-and burn,” this project, titled “Splash and Burn” brings to light the problem of illegal palm oil harvesting in Indonesia. Over the course of two years, Zacharevic has gathered a group of creatives which include, Mark Jenkins, Axel Void, Pixel Pancho, Isaac Cordal, Strok, Gabriel Pitcher and Bibichun. Smane 2, Combat, and Reginal O’Niel have also contributed to the project.

splash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-09 Isaac Cordal in North Sumatra | Photo by Isaac Cordal

Conflict palm oil harvesting is not only an environmental issue but a human rights violation due to its effects on transboundary haze, deforestation, and human and animal displacement.Indonesia happens to be the largest producer of palm oil. Facing the large consumer demand for palm oil and timber, the local economy resorts to the “slash-and-burn” to clear up large patches of forest land for palm oil plantations. Farmers first cut down vegetation and set a fire to quickly clear the rest. The World Wildlife Fund estimates that up to 300 football fields of forest are cleared every hour. Indonesia happens to be the largest producer of palm oil.This not only affects Indonesia but forests worldwide.

2splash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-03Ernest Zacharevic in Bukit Lawang | Photo by Ernest Zacharevic

In regards to the environment, “Slash-and-burn” produces emits greenhouse gases, harms local vegetation, threatens biodiversity, destroys animal homes, and pollutes the water. The fires produce a thick smog that engulfs the air. The yellow toxic air has caused 6 Indonesian provinces to declare a state of emergency. To put it in perspective, anything above a 300 pollution index is considered hazardous. Areas of Indonesia can reach as high as 2,000 on the pollution index.

splash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-05Mark Jenkins in Riau Peatlands | Photo by Ernest Zacharevic

Local communities are the first to feel these effects. Deforestation threatens the livelihood of farmers and locals outside of the palm oil industry. Many companies develop farms without the consideration of indigenous people who rely on or occupy the land. Rarely are these people compensated. Children as young as 7 years old can be found working for these companies to support their families. They are paid low wages for long hours and sometimes paid none at all. According to the NGO, Friends of the Earth, the palm oil industry is one of the top four worst industries of forced and child labor.

yessplash-and-burn-street-art-campaign-indonesia-designboom-02Ernest Zacharevic in Medan | Photo by Ernest Zacharevic

Zacherevic first became interested in the matter when clouds of smoke traveled from Indonesia to the location of his studio in Penang, Malaysia. Though the issue does receive some International attention, Zacherevic felt that the media needed to bring light to the outside of the burning seasons. Working with international as well as local Indonesian NGOs such as OIC, “Splash and Burn” creates a platform for an otherwise overlooked crisis. Over the course of two years, Zacherevic worked with these organizations to gather spaces for his curated group of artists to tell a story about the issue. Ranging from murals to installations to sculptures, each piece highlights a different victim of the issue.

YAS        Isaac Cordal in North Sumatra | Photo by Isaac Cordal

Ultimately, Zacherevic’s desire for “Slash and Burn” is to educate worldwide consumers on the direct connection they have with this corrupt industry. From food to cosmetics, palm oil can be found in countless products. Consciously buying products derived from conflict-free palm oil can drive down the consumer demand and make a bold statement about popular palm oil farming practices.

More info about Zacherevic and “Splash and Burn” can be found at: http://www.ernestzacharevic.com/splash-and-burn-2/

To learn more about the illegal palm oil industry and what you can do to stop it, head to:  http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/

Support the displaced Orangutans:                                                                             http://orangutancentre.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Behind the scenes of “Everyone Deserves a Home” community mural

“Everyone Deserves a Home” is a testament to the community of the Tenderloin and a promise of hope and security. We wanted to share some behind the 1AM scenes shots of this epic street art mural.   This mural, overlooking the recently revamped Boedekker Park, brings new life and vibrancy to the Tenderloin community. This project was made possible and in collaboration with DISH, Friends of Boeddeker Park, and the Community Challenge Grant Program by SF Beautiful.  For more info, contact murals@1amsf.com

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Kids Street Art Class

We got back in touch with the kid inside of us with a workshop for these little guys. It was great to show these kids how to make their own art. Check out their finished products!

For team building workshop or private class inquiries please contact vanessa@1amsf.com

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Sneak Peek at “Tourist,” Opening Tomorrow!

With the opening of Ratur and Sckaro’s “Tourist” tomorrow night, we’ve been busy here at 1AMSF. But even with all of the set-up going on, we wanted to make sure you all got a sneak peek at what’s in store for you all! Here are a behind-the-scenes photos to hold you over until you can get your fill at the opening on the 20th, from 6:30pm – 9:30pm. Ratur and Sckaro dedicated the theme of this awesome show to the city of San Francisco, and each piece is a unique view of the city’s key characteristics, which to us have become so familiar that we cannot appreciate them, through the fresh perspective of the tourist. Enjoy!

For catalogue inquires, email: artsales@1amgallery.com

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Street Art and Social Change: Steven Grounds Reclaims a Native American Boarding School

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Artist, Steven Grounds, has been working hard the last couple years, filling the interior and exterior walls of an abandoned Native American boarding school in Concho, Oklahoma. The boarding school, during its years of operation from 1909-1983, had members from the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes among other Native American students. Grounds is Navajo and Euchee himself, and he obtained permission to paint the buildings from the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribe two years ago. He has been painting portraits of  his heroes and even of students who once walked the same halls ever since.

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Native American boarding schools have a dreadful history in the United States. They were built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to provide education and to give opportunity for children with no formal schools in their vicinity. In reality, Native American boarding schools were seen as the means for the government to achieve assimilation of Native Americans. Children were usually immersed in European-American culture through appearance changes with haircuts, were forbidden to speak their native languages, and traditional names were replaced by new European-American names. The experience of the schools was often harsh, especially for the younger children who were separated from their families. In numerous ways, they were encouraged or forced to abandon their Native American identities and cultures.

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Abandoned Native American boarding school in Concho, Oklahoma

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Photograph from the Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency’s Catholic School (1920-33) (via Bureau of Indian Affairs. Concho Agency/National Archives and Records Administration)

Grounds’ work is connecting history, culture, and time to place. The abandoned school was left for ruin but he has done what street artists are good at – activating spaces. “When you walk in here you can feel that energy, that there is a history here,” says Grounds. And about his portraits he adds, “I take them as a way to show reverence. So what I paint in here comes from a place of respect.”

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Behind the scenes: ‘I Am What I Am’ Opening tomorrow

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Sneak peek… Mark Bode’s busy at work finishing our interior & exterior murals for his Cheech Wizard Tribute, “I Am What I Am” at 1AM. Don’t miss the opening tomorrow, Thursday Feb. 4th from 6:30-9:30PM. There is an original Vaughn Bode comic only available for viewing at the opening!

Other highlights of the show feature:
– Never before seen work by Vaughn Bode
– A variety of new limited edition prints from Mark Bode
– Custom working Pinball Machine: the “Molly Snatch Machine”
– 2 original drawings from Vaughn Bode
– Licensing Sheet used by Puma and other product companies

Make sure to RSVP! For catalog requests:  adriana@1amgallery.com

See you there!

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Last Chance to Check Out “Catch Me If You Can!”

Heads up–Ratur and Sckaro’s “Catch Me If You Can” show closes December 19th, their insane surrealist oil paintings are not to be missed. This is your last chance to stop by the gallery, we’re open this Wednesday through Saturday, 12-6:30 PM. This duo’s high-octane work will blow you away!

Ratur's "First Amendment", oil on canvas, 30x44"

Ratur’s “First Amendment,” oil on canvas, 30×44″

Following the close of “Catch Me If You Can,” we have big things planned here at 1AM. Over the holidays we’ll be completely revamping our space, planning for a new and improved gallery in 2016… announcements and updates for the new year to come soon! Stay tuned.

Click here to view the gallery’s page. For catalog requests/art inquiries please contact Adriana@1amgallery.com.

“Catch Me If You Can” Opening Night Recap

Last night’s opening of “Catch Me If You Can” showcased a body of captivatingly distorted and surrealist work from the French brothers, Ratur and Sckaro. The two brothers share a lifelong partnership of painting in the streets and in the studio–this collection brilliantly reveals their roots in classical oil painting and graffiti. The dynamic and colorful show produced positive energy from existing and new fans of the artists alike.

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A big thank you to everyone that came out to support Ratur and Sckaro. “Catch Me If You Can” is on display until January 7th, Tuesdays-Saturdays from 12PM-6:30PM. For catalog requests/art inquiries please contact Adriana(at)1amgallery(dot)com.

The artists

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Our Friend Mark Bode Is Getting Served!

Yesterday our friend Mark Bode stopped by the 1AM Prism print shop to finalize some limited sizes for a new run of “Lizard Of Oz” prints we are serving up for him.  Check out our 1AM Prism Services or stop by the shop at 1000 Howard Street in San Francisco to chat with our Prism production department about getting your our limited edition prints produced.  You can also email prints@1amsf.com for more information.

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