WHICH WAY, THAT WAY 8/24 – 9/21

UPCOMING GROUP SHOW at First Amendment Gallery featuring…

Adam Friedman
Andrew Antonaccio
Anthony Hurd
Clark Goolsby
Dan Hampe
Dan Lam
David Cooley
Ellen Rutt
Francesco Lo Castro
Hoxxoh
Jose Di Gregorio
Katy Gilmore
Kristin Farr
Optimist

Opening Reception | Thursday, August 24th
Showing Through | September 21st 2017

To be added to the collectors preview contact
info@firstamendmentgallery.com

 

Facebook at 1AM SF!

Facebook joins us at 1Am SF for a graffiti art class where they got to create their own Facebook mural piece! With the guidance of our graffiti teachers groups get to come in and create an exciting experience through learning and creating street art. Our workshops are great ways to do something different with your company and team build as you create your very own mural. For emails and inquiries contact vanessa@1amsf.com to sign up for one of our awesome team building workshops!

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Apple Visits 1AM GENERATOR

Apple came by our Oakland location for a team building workshop! The 1AM graffiti classes are a great way to engage your team in a fun and exciting way. Each company gets to create their very own customized mural with the help of  our talented graffiti artists. Contact vanessa@1amsf.com for any interests and sign up for a workshop with 1AM this summer!

 

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Team Building with Dropbox

Dropbox came in and created their own “Dropbugs” mural with our graffiti team! The group enjoyed themselves as they learned how to spray paint and work as a team painting on our wall at the 1AM SF Gallery location. With the help of our talented mural team you can join us at 1AM for group and private workshops where you too can create your very own tags and spray paint a mural. For all inquiries and interests contact vanessa@1amsf.com for a quote or consultation!

 

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Nature meet City by 1AM muralists

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Camping has always been a great escape from urban living and when Campsyte tasked us with bringing the redwoods to downtown San Francisco, we were compelled to appease mother nature.

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As part of San Francisco’s first outdoor co-working and event space Outcamp, we created a mural as a background encompassing the space to evoke the feeling of nature and being one with the elements.  Campsyte’s vision of a shared backyard leans on the studies that environments in nature reduce stress.

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For more info, contact murals@1amsf.com

 

“Hope for the Future Gives Power to the Present” 1AM Mural

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While our mural artists often come from community input and careful thought with a predetermined wall, this particular mural’s message was in hand prior to having a wall to paint it.  When the opportunity arose to be part of the mural festival, SprayView (located in the SF Bayview district),  I knew I had found the right home.  So where did this mural’s message come from?

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For those of you that attended Lick Wilmerding High School, Coach Elliot Smith should be no stranger to you and was a major influence on me.  I’ll just share one example I’ll never forget of his positivity and wisdom.   Right after going through jv basketball team tryouts and getting cut, I was upset and went to Coach Smith to explain (aka angrily vent) that I felt I deserved to be on the team and was upset that Coach Mack (jv basketball coach) didn’t see my best performance.  Coach Smith’s advice was to go to the first day of practice and tell Coach Mack how I felt and prove to him that I deserved to be on the team.  I wanted to be on the team so badly that the hunger overcame my incredible fear of embarrassment of coming to the first day of practice after being cut and asking for another shot.  Coach Mack did end of giving me a shot to prove myself and I’ll never forget his words “You’ve shown tremendous heart, courage, and hustle in coming back that you deserve to be on the team”.

When I reconnected with Coach Smith last year, he remarkably remembered me and I asked him if he could say anything to the world, what would it be?  Thanks Coach for giving me hope to take action in the present.

For more info, contact murals@1amsf.com

Street Art & Social Change: Za’atari Art Project

As the Syrian Refugee Crisis continues on, the Za’atari refugee camp in Northern Jordan has become the second largest refugee camp in the world. Founded in July 2012, the camp grew rapidly and has since reached nearly 100,000 inhabitants. While the camp is often referred to as a ‘refugee metropolis,’ the site is unmistakably destitute for such a large community. Food and proper accommodation are just two of the many human needs that the refugees are struggling to fulfill; others include constructive and productive activities for the youth. As education is not and cannot be a priority during times of strife, the children in Za’atari are faced with a bleak existence.

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US artist Joel Bergners recognized this need for community building activities that would provide positive experiences in the lives of the Syrian youth, and began the Za’atari Art Project in collaboration with several Middle Eastern artists, including Yusra Ali and Ali Kiwan. In this initiative, children participate in workshops that teach them artistic techniques and social skills simultaneously as they create murals for the camp walls. Yusra Ali is a female Palestinian artist who lives in a nearby town, who combines her artistic talent with her affinity for working with children. Kiwan is a Za’atari resident who collaborated with Bergners on many murals, joining street art techniques, children art styles, and traditional arabesque patterns to reflect the unique perspectives of the camp’s youth.

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The mural project provides children in the camp with an outlet through which they can express themselves, while also building relationships and learning important skills for life and art alike. Mural themes have included what the children missed most about home, what they dream of for the future, as well as the uplifting reminder that the future is in their hands. One demographic of the camp youth includes the “wheelbarrow boys,” young boys who bring items across campgrounds and sell them on the black market, a very dangerous employment for children. The art initiative taught the boys to paint, and allowed them to paint their wheelbarrows in vibrant, joyous hues, and the boys responded very well.

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As a communal entity, the children and artists have created a vibrant, uplifting visual culture within the Za’atari camp, providing a source of life and energy against the dreary background of the Jordan deserts. Many of these refugees would appreciate this, as they were forced to flee their lush, green oasis of Daraa in the midst of the Syrian Civil War. The Za’atari project provides a voice to the refugee youth, who are often overlooked in the crisis. Without a decisive ceasefire in sight, and with so many struggles plaguing the refugees internationally, these murals function as a source of community and hope for the camp inhabitants.

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Street Art & Social Change: Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

On the streets of Brooklyn in 2012, local street artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh decided that she had had enough of catcalling. After a stranger on the street asked her to smile for him, she used this as the basis for an ongoing series of street art entitled, Stop Telling Women to Smile (STWTS). Late at night, armed with a roller brush and some posters, Fazlalizadeh began wheat-pasting graphite posters on the walls of public streets, the most common site of catcalling. These posters are all portraits of women, some of the artist herself, but mostly of various different women from all kinds of walks of life. Fazlalizadeh realized as her project went on that street harassment was not restricted to women like her, but that women of all skin colors, religions, sexualities and gender expression were targets as well. In the end, this inspired the diversity and multilinguality of STWTS.

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These portraits are strong, they are sources of power for women. Fazlalizadeh interviewed several women before she made portraits of them. She wanted to understand how experiences differed from and paralleled each other, so that each figure took on her own identity and backstory. These women are direct, they do not allow themselves to be looked upon. They instead look back at their audience, authoritative and powerful. The power of the male gaze is impotent for these women, the only gaze they allow is their own.
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Each figure is accompanied by text, some in English, but also in Spanish, French, and other languages. The text is usually different for each figure, but the tone is the same: there is no debt women owe to men, no reason to be harassed, no place for catcalling. STWTS expands as Fazlalizadeh travels to new places with new cultures, and stands as a visual protest to a patriarchal society that has not learned the true power of the female.

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Pemex & Klops on Widewalls

Pemex and Klops Join Forces in an Exhibition at 1AM Gallery

Last week we stopped by Pemex’s studio to check out the last few steps for his duo show with Klops, “Get With The Program”. Thanks Widewalls.ch for covering the studio visit! See the pair’s finished work at the opening reception at our downtown San Francisco gallery, this Thursday, March 2nd, from 7-10pm. To request a catalog preview: artsales@1amgallery.com.

 

 

Spotlight: A House In Oakland

A House In Oakland has been developed through the collaboration of activists, filmmakers, and graffiti writers as a direct response to the struggles of the homeless community. The collective strives to provide basic necessities to people forced to the streets by gentrification and displacement. This Valentines Day, A House In Oakland provided handmade shelter to homeless men and women.