Cordal 5

The less commonly practiced genre of street art, sculpture, is a unique category. Breaking the confines of 2D, sculptural street art can be as beautiful, poignant, and powerful as it’s siblings, painting and pasting. Perhaps its the installation of sculptures on the street without permission that sways most to paint and paper. It takes a great deal more coordination, planning, and funding to be able to haul a large piece into the street, install it, and leave without causing much of a scene. Nevertheless, artists step up to the challenge and work with the limitations.

Cordal 2

This week we are looking at Spanish artist, Isaac Cordal, who has been based and working in Berlin. Cordal’s work is captivating – if you can see it. He is a sculptor on the miniature scale. Cordal creates small cement figures (often frumpy balding business men) and arranges them in site-specific scenes in streets around the world. His work is critical and thought provoking, inviting viewers to look inside themselves and ask big questions about the state of the world and what is most important. “The art work intends to catch the attention on our devalued relation with the nature through a critical look to the collateral effects of our evolution.”

Cordal 8

Cordal created this body of work as part of the Łódź 4 Cultures Festival, held in Łódź, Poland. The festival is an annual event, artistic and social, referring to the founding history of Lodz: city built by hands of Germans, Jews, Russians and Poles. The small cement figures are each standing on their own balcony, overlooking the street below, detached, yet hopelessly connected. Cordal’s miniatures are almost a congratulatory visual prize for those who have their eyes up and are aware, and not glued to their phones moving from point A to point B as quickly as possible. Be sure to check out his website, and follow his travels and actions around the world!

(awareness via Brooklyn Street Art and photos © Isaac Cordial)