"At the Epoch of Eras: Utopian Marketplace" by Eve Skylar

"At the Epoch of Eras: Utopian Marketplace" by Eve Skylar

“‘Broken’ and ‘hope’ are the two strong words to describe the Rusted Souls’ world: broken robots, broken people, broken ideals, and the thing that persevered was the people’s hope for the future.”  -Eve Skylar

Eve Skylar, one of our featured artists and top-sellers from the current exhibition, gave us some comical and in-depth answers during her interview:

Can you talk a little bit about your work in this exhibit and how it relates to “The Rusted Souls“?

When James proposed “The Rusted Souls” as a concept art themed show, I was thrilled to see how the different worlds might look like: totalitarian, utopian, and dystopian states. Having worked as a production designer and concept artist on
animated films, I tend to see paintings through the cinematic lens. So I wanted to create a narrative of the Rusted Souls environments through a progression of shapes and color.

What kind of artist do you consider yourself?

I am a visual story-teller/artist. I tell stories through my art.

What’s your favorite thing to draw?

Everything fascinates me. But people point out to me that I tend to draw a lot of trees and robots. Apparently as a kid, I drew animals and their poop.

How did you get started making art?

When I was seven years old, my parents enrolled me in a city-wide drawing competition. They bought me oil pastels and my uncle handcrafted a drawing  table. The theme was “a normal Sunday.” I drew an elephant playing soccer. I didn’t win any awards. But that one experience was etched into my memory. My parents didn’t have much, but they always tried to prioritize and give me early life experiences. The rest of my life afterwards was pretty much about survival. I worked two jobs and got myself through college. It wasn’t until about five years ago that I consciously decided to start making art again. I have a lot of people to thank for it.

What is something people may not know about you?

I like to surf. When I lived in Long Beach, I surfed almost every day along the Pacific Coast Highway. I have a 7’8” trick board waiting for me. I once got stung by a stingray.

Where is one your favorite places to go in the city?

You can probably find me sketching inside Café Hana or perusing Kinokuniya in Japantown or in Green Apple Bookstore on Clement Street.

Can you give us some insight behind your three major paintings?

I  wanted to include weather and time of day into the environment narrative. The “Utopian” painting, with its brighter palette emphasizes the ideals of sunny daytime. The “Night Watch” nurses “hope” through a blistery snowy night just
before the break of dawn. The painting “Infiltration” (inside the Capitol), with its industrial complex working around the clock, takes place during an unknown- ambiguous dusty timelessness, when it is either always daytime or always nighttime.

A lot of these discoveries came by through my sketch explorations. “Broken” and “hope” are the two strong words to describe the Rusted Souls’ world: broken robots, broken people, broken ideals, and the thing that persevered was the people’s hope for the future.

What advice would you give to artists?

Art is freedom!
Do what you love. Get heated about life. Chase your dream with all your pride.
Challenge yourself, seek new skills, and grow to “see” better.

Art is a lifetime’s worth of adventures and everyone travels differently. Your best guide to “getting there” is to ask your seven-year-old self. You are more than you think, you have the courage and imagination to see beyond “impossible” things.

 Art is: a riot!

For more information, you can visit her official website: www.eveskylar.com
Eve would like to thank: 1AM, Maya Griffin, James Garcia, Rick Kitagawa, Martha Tian, family and friends.

The Rusted Souls” exhibit will be showing until May 6th.