Sneak Peek at “Tourist,” Opening Tomorrow!

With the opening of Ratur and Sckaro’s “Tourist” tomorrow night, we’ve been busy here at 1AMSF. But even with all of the set-up going on, we wanted to make sure you all got a sneak peek at what’s in store for you all! Here are a behind-the-scenes photos to hold you over until you can get your fill at the opening on the 20th, from 6:30pm – 9:30pm. Ratur and Sckaro dedicated the theme of this awesome show to the city of San Francisco, and each piece is a unique view of the city’s key characteristics, which to us have become so familiar that we cannot appreciate them, through the fresh perspective of the tourist. Enjoy!

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Salesforce Street Art Workshop

Salesforce came by for a day of stencil and street art creations! Our Street Art Package is a great option for groups looking to do more individualized activities and gives each guest something to take home with them. Check out the awesome stencil based mural they created on a canvass to take back to their offices!

For team building workshops or private class inquiries please contact vanessa@1amsf.comsalesforce workshopsalesforce workshopsalesforce workshop

PlanGrid Team Building Workshop

PlanGrid came by 1AMSF for an exciting team building workshop that brought out everyones creativity! Check out their awesome mural they created as a group on our outside wall!

For team building workshop or private class inquiries please contact

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An Interview with Zekwer

In honor of his show here 1AM, we thought it would be a great idea to interview Zekwer and get to know more about him, his Alphabetism series, and the street art scene as a French artist.

What was your inspiration for the Alphabetism series?

For this series, my source of inspiration was simply the thousands of letters that I have seen throughout my life. But I work a lot on spontaneity, try to always maintain this side of freestyle that gives you some freedom but also doesn’t give you room for error. I scraped a lot of pieces after I started this medium, so after a while you try to combine multiple styles and then it becomes natural.

Pour cette série, ma source d’inspiration est tout simplement les milliers de lettrages que j’ai put voir tout au long de ma vie. Mais je travaille beaucoup sur la spontanéité, essayer de toujours garder ce côté freestyle qui te donne une part de liberté mais qui ne te donne pas droit à l’ erreur aussi. J’ai gratté des milliers de feuilles depuis que je suis rentré dans ce milieu, donc au bout d’un moment tu essayes de combiner plusieurs styles et le tracé devient naturel.

Do you have a favorite letter/piece in the series?

Yes, definitely and at the time I noticed that letters that I would have hated in my own work, became friends and no longer vulgar, useless shapes. But my preferred ones are W X K Y C G R.

Oui bien-sûr et au fil du temps je me suis aperçus que des lettres que j’aurai détesté avoir dans mon lettrage sont devenus des amies et non plus de vulgaire formes inutiles. Mais, mes préférées sont le W X K Y C G R


What’s the graffiti scene like over in France compared to here in the US?

What stuck out to me was the lack of open, friendly space where everyone can paint. Here you have to find your own small patch/space on a wall belonging to some store and each artist, has their own playground/territory.

In France, you can go to different cities and you will always find enormous areas that have been closed down and find artists to make connections with or dare each other with large pieces. The level of artistry on the streets is really impressive but I’ll always have a preference for the European scene when it comes to murals.

La chose qui m’as le plus marqué est le manque de gros terrain convivial ou tt le monde peut peindre, ici tu dois trouver ton petit carré de mur chez le commerçant et chaque tracteurs à son propre terrain de jeux. 

En France , tu peux aller dans différentes villes et tu trouveras toujours un énorme spot désaffecté et rencontrer des artistes pour créer des connexions ou se défier via de grosses productions.Le le niveau dans la rue est vraiment impressionnant mais j’ai toujours une préférence pour la scène européenne en ce qui concernent les fresques.
How did you and RPES become friends?

We come from a small town where everyone knows each other, so it makes sense to run into each other at the only spot in the city where we could paint. When you practice this type of art in a small town, the connections form a lot faster. And after all, he is a good guy.

Nous sommes originaire d’une petite ville où tt le monde se connait dc c’ était logique de se rencontrer dans l unique spot de la ville.Quand tu pratique cet art dans une petite ville les connections se font plus vite. De plus, c’un bon gars.

What would you say has been your biggest challenge as an artist?

To have people understand that graffiti is an artistic movement and not visual pollution.

Faire comprendre aux gens que le graffiti est un mouvement artistique et non pas de la pollution visuelle.

How do you want people to respond to your work?

Preferably in a positive manner if it’s other artists, but if it’s not to each their own. Everyone is allowed to think what they want about my art. What matters is that I seek to please, paint, design, and evolve.

De préférence de manière positive sin ça vient d’autres artistes mais sinon je laisse libre à chacun de penser ce qu’il veut de mon art, le principal c’est que je trouve du plaisir a peindre,dessiner et évoluer.

Aside from your art, what other things are you passionate about?

Travelling!!! Meeting new people in new places. But otherwise, I’m a sports addict.

Voyager!!!! Rencontrer de nouvelles personnes, de nouveaux lieux. Mais sinon je suis un accroc de sport.

What’s coming up next for your career?

 Actually, I just finished moving to the island of Reunion, so I’m taking advantage of spending time with my family and the views of paradise, maybe putting together an exposition or two. But painting from all four corners of the world is still my ultimate goal.
Actuellement je viens de m’installer sur l’île de la réunion,dc je profites avec ma famille et je profites de cadre paradisiaque et réaliser une  expo ou deux.
Mais peindre ds les quatre coin du monde reste mon kiff ultime.
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Kickin’ it with TWITTER

Twitter came by this past week to learn the history of graffiti and create their own group mural on our wall outside! Check out pictures of their creative mural making process below:

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Street Art and Social Change: Mobstr Mocks Public Advertising


One of the strongest political channels in the street art movement is the questioning of what is allowed and what isn’t allowed in our shared public spaces. Advertisements are almost everywhere we look today in most major cities, and some artists and activists question what this does to our individual and societal psyche. What effect does being pummeled by consumerism, commodity, and lifestyle advertisements have on us? Well, one very well known critique is the British artist, Mobstr. Mobstr is known for his urban interventions, and progression pieces, which he “collaborates” with city cleaners/buffers. Today we look at a couple new pieces by Mobstr which invite observers to questions both the lack of democratic process involved in what happens in our public spaces, and also the effects of technology, image, and self-absorption. Well done, Mobstr!


Back to School with Marshall Elementary

Fall is here! As students are settling into their classes all over San Francisco, the students at Marshall Elementary school are showing off their new mural on 15th street — painted and designed by the 2nd through 5th graders.

Made possible by funding and volunteers from Google and Deloitte, 1AM worked with Marshall Elementary and Mission Graduates to beautify Marshall Elementary School’s north-facing wall, on the corner of 15th & Capp Street. The corner was previously a dull, beige color, that didn’t have any visual indication of children or learning inside–sometimes creating a problem with loitering and drug use.

In the last week of school this past June, we visited the after-school program at Marshall Elementary to explain a bit about the importance of murals and public art in urban cities. The students then each designed their own mural concept, based on their S.T.E.A.M. curriculum (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math). A school-wide cafeteria vote was held, and the students selected their top 3 designs.

Our artists drafted a sketch based off these 3 designs, and got set to paint. School ended, and the summer program started with Mission Graduates. Each afternoon for a week, we met with the kids and volunteers, teaching them how to use spray paint to create a community mural for their school. From 2nd to 5th grade, everyone painted their own portion–even the teachers!

A special thank you again to the SFUSD, Marshall Elementary, Mission Graduates, Google, and Deloitte! This was one of our most special projects to date.

For custom mural inquiries:

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Hellbent’s “Remnants” Opening Night Recap

We had a blast Thursday night with the opening of “Remnants,” by JMikal Davis, aka Hellbent. A huge thanks to everyone who came out to join us–it was great to see some familiar faces, and awesome to see so many new ones checking out the stunning resin work. If you weren’t able to make it to opening night, don’t worry. Hellbent’s untamed colors and wild lines will still be up on display until October 13th, so be sure to come on by and take in all the energy!

A special congratulations to Hellbent for his amazing collection!

You can view the full “Remnants” collection here. For inquiries:

“Everyone Deserves a Home,” Finished!

Last Wednesday, crowds gathered at Boeddeker Park to see the finished six-story mural that had been in the works for so long. This colorful, vibrant addition to the Windsor Hotel is the product of many months of designing, revising, and careful execution by the 1AM Mural Team, and the community has received it with overwhelming praise. “Everyone Deserves a Home” is a testament to the community of the Tenderloin and a promise of hope and security. This mural, overlooking the recently revamped park, bring new life and vibrancy to the Tenderloin community. A big thanks and congrats to DISH, Friends of Boeddeker Park, and the Community Challenge Grant Program for allowing 1AM to help achieve this awesome goal! Read more about the project’s impact on the neighborhood from Hoodline, here.

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Boedekker Mural

Street Art and Social Change: Steven Grounds Reclaims a Native American Boarding School


Artist, Steven Grounds, has been working hard the last couple years, filling the interior and exterior walls of an abandoned Native American boarding school in Concho, Oklahoma. The boarding school, during its years of operation from 1909-1983, had members from the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes among other Native American students. Grounds is Navajo and Euchee himself, and he obtained permission to paint the buildings from the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribe two years ago. He has been painting portraits of  his heroes and even of students who once walked the same halls ever since.

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Native American boarding schools have a dreadful history in the United States. They were built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to provide education and to give opportunity for children with no formal schools in their vicinity. In reality, Native American boarding schools were seen as the means for the government to achieve assimilation of Native Americans. Children were usually immersed in European-American culture through appearance changes with haircuts, were forbidden to speak their native languages, and traditional names were replaced by new European-American names. The experience of the schools was often harsh, especially for the younger children who were separated from their families. In numerous ways, they were encouraged or forced to abandon their Native American identities and cultures.


Abandoned Native American boarding school in Concho, Oklahoma


Photograph from the Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency’s Catholic School (1920-33) (via Bureau of Indian Affairs. Concho Agency/National Archives and Records Administration)

Grounds’ work is connecting history, culture, and time to place. The abandoned school was left for ruin but he has done what street artists are good at – activating spaces. “When you walk in here you can feel that energy, that there is a history here,” says Grounds. And about his portraits he adds, “I take them as a way to show reverence. So what I paint in here comes from a place of respect.”